The Following is an Excerpt from this Book

Perpetual motion refers to the motion of bodies in a natural environment that continues indefinitely without interruptions. A perpetual motion machine is supposedly a fictional machine that can move and run eternally without requiring any external energy. The making of the machine is impossible because it would contravene both the first and second laws of thermodynamics. These thermodynamic principles apply irrespective of the system’s magnitude. The required rotations and motions of celestial bodies, like planets, may seem to be endless. However, they are subject to an end number of processes that steadily dissolve their kinetic energy. Examples are gravitational radiation, solar wind, thermal radiation, and interstellar medium resistance. Still, they will not continue infinitely.
Machines that collect energy from finite sources, on the other hand, will not run endlessly. They are powered by the energy inherent in the source, which will ultimately run out. Equipment powered by ocean currents, whose energy is essentially taken from the Sun, is a common finding. This energy will eventually burn out. Machines that are powered by fewer popular sources have been considered. Still, they are subject to the same unavoidable rules and will inevitably fail to prosper.
New states of matter, called time crystals, were discovered in 2017. It states that the component atoms are in continuous motion on a small scale. It upholds the literal meaning of the Law of Perpetual Motion. However, because the atoms are in their quantum ground state, no energy can be recovered. They demonstrate motion without energy. They do not represent perpetual motion machines in the usual way or contradict thermodynamic rules.

Read:  Java Fundamentals | eBook | AudioBook

has been added to your cart!

have been added to your cart!


has been added to your cart!

have been added to your cart!


has been added to your cart!

have been added to your cart!

SSLSECURED PAYMENT

Your information is protected by 256-bit SSL encryption